In the late 1700s, the King of Spain, ruler of the territory, made three land grants. He gave the Jefferson Island area to Eugene Carlin, the northern part of the Delcambre community to Charles Prevoux, and the southern part, as well as the land where the town stands today, to Jean Petit. Although the grant holders were Frenchmen, the King of Spain insisted that the land be settled by Spaniards. The Delcambre land grants were rather idle until the migration of the Acadians from Nova Scotia.

Today, fresh seafood and a growing community help make Delcambre one of the most promising towns along the Louisiana Gulf Coast. This small seaport along Highway 14 is linked to Lake Peigneur on Jefferson Island and the Gulf of Mexico by the Delcambre Canal (Bayou Carlin). The harbor has long been a hub for the seafood industry, especially shrimping. To celebrate this,  the town holds the annual Delcambre Shrimp Festival, which is one of Louisiana’s major festivals.

Local fishermen harvest an abundance of seafood, much of which is served in Vermilion Parish restaurants. The Twin Parish Port Commission, along with the LSU Ag Center and the Louisiana Sea Grant, have created a marketplace where consumers are able to contact fishermen directly to purchase shrimp and other seafood fresh from the dock. Boats dock at the Delcambre Direct Seafood Docks and the Bayou Carlin Cove Boat Landing to sell their catch directly to the public. Quality, wild-caught fresh or frozen Louisiana seafood is available on a seasonal basis. The availability of fresh seafood makes the monthly Seafood and Farmers Market one of the most unique farmers market in the country and features food, music, Cajun food and handmade arts and crafts.

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